Persue

Persue vs. Pursue – Which is Correct?2 min read

Autocorrect on my laptop already says that “Persue” is incorrect because of the word’s red underline. The fantastic thing is that these words are homophones (words that sound alike), but one is the other’s misspelling.

Persue seems correct, but it doesn’t exist in the English dictionary. Research says that it is the old way of spelling “Pursue,” but Wiktionary sees it as the common misspelling of the original word.

Persue vs. Pursue

Meaning of Pursue:

The word “Pursue” means to chase someone or something with the intent to get hold of it. It could also mean “to aim for” in the aspect of pursuing a dream or chasing a dream. Pursue is derived from the Latin word “prōsequī ” meaning to chase or pursue.

Examples:

  • Motivational speakers will always tell you to “pursue your dreams.”
  • I was asked to pursue the tricycle carrying the red box.
  • For you to pursue your dreams, you have to leave your comfort zone.
  • “Hey, pursue the guy on blue pants,” Jack said.

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Persue vs. Pursue

Meaning of Persue:

An old-fashioned way of describing the ideal word “pursue.” It is often a misspelling that occurs among writers and communicators.

Examples:

  • The first time I was “Prince of Persia,” I thought it was “Prince of Persue.”
  • Don’t persue any lady; the right one will fall in place. (incorrect)
  • Always learn to persue the right dream at the right time. (incorrect)
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Persue vs. Pursue – How to identify:

These two words can be confusing as both differ with a switch of “e” and “u.” The best and easiest way to identify the correct word is to learn both words and know that “Pursue” is the right word while the other is incorrect or misspelling.

What does Pursued mean?

Pursued is the past tense of the word “Pursue.” Someone made a statement saying, “I pursued my degree till the last, and now I’m a lawyer.” It entails that “pursued my degree” means that the person involved worked passionately and tirelessly to get the degree.

Examples:

  • I pursued the doctorate till the last exam.
  • The man that pursued the gambler was the storekeeper.

Read this: Certificate vs Degree – Which is Better?

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